Sunday, March 29, 2020

Preparing for government quarantine for parents of new born babies

Starting from midnight last night, those arriving in Australia are required to be in Government quarantine upon arrival for 14 days at their place of arrival. Australian Defence Force personnel have been deployed to enforce the rules. For parents who have undertaken surrogacy overseas and brought their newborn children (and sometimes older children as well) this poses extra challenges, including having enough supplies.

For those who arrive in one place and have to fly to another, there might be two lots of quarantine last a month. In addition to the international quarantine requirements, the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia require arrivals by air to be quarantined for 14 days. Travellers arriving in Sydney, for example, and flying to the Gold Coast will first have to undertake Government quarantine in a hotel chosen by the Government in Sydney. Once those 14 days are up, they can fly on to the Gold Coast, but will then be required to self-isolate for another 14 days. By the time they get to fly to the Gold Coast, who knows if the quarantine will be Government quarantine, too.

The supplies to travellers are the responsibility of the Government. Yesterday in my daily self-isolation call with the Red Cross, I was told- definitively- that the Red Cross is not involved in providing supplies to those travellers, nor has Red Cross Australia been asked to check on the welfare of those travellers. Hopefully this changes. Instead I was told that the issue of urgent supplies might be covered by the Community Recovery Hotline 1800 173 349.

There have been reports from Sydney of travellers complaining of the standard of accommodation, and the unreliability of food, or at least the quality of food being providing to the travellers.

For parents who have returned from overseas, delays in the provision of vital supplies should be assumed. Therefore, parents should ensure as much as possible they bring supplies with them to tide them over. If they are relying on formula, they should not assume that the same formula will be provided by the government.

A useful checklist of what supplies can be brought can be found here. Travellers bringing baby formula and other baby food need to declare it.

Friday, March 27, 2020

Returning Australians to be quarantined in hotels

As of midnight Saturday,  returning Australians are to be quarantined in hotels for 14 days-at the expense of States, according to the Prime Minister, with severe penalties to apply.

Canadian entry restrictions

Canada's entry restrictions from 25 March are set out below. Canada will let anyone in who already has a Canadian child. A big thank you to my Canadian colleague Cindy Wasser for sharing this information with me.

Travel restriction measures: COVID-19 program delivery

This section contains policy, procedures and guidance used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada staff. It is posted on the Department’s website as a courtesy to stakeholders.
Air travel and border measures have been implemented to protect the health and safety of Canadians by restricting non-essential international travel. These instructions describe IRCC’s role in supporting the administration of these measures and provides guidance on applying some of the exemptions that are in place to facilitate necessary travel.
Important note: Regular travel document requirements for air travel and entry to Canada continue to apply. Foreign nationals who are exempted from the travel restrictions must continue to meet all travel document requirements under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR).

On this page

Travel restrictions affecting foreign nationals

These restrictions have been implemented under the authority of the Minister of Health through emergency orders under the Quarantine Act and of the Minister of Transport through interim orders under the Aeronautics ActFootnote 1 (the Orders).
In the air mode, the basic rule is that foreign nationals are prohibited from boarding an aircraft for a flight to Canada when
  • the flight is departing from any country other than the United States, and
  • the foreign national is not covered by any of the exemptions in the Orders
Canadian citizens, permanent residents and protected persons continue to be permitted to board an aircraft, subject to health screening measures.

Immediate family members

The definition of immediate family members set out in Interim Order No. 2 is broader than that in IRPA (spouses and common-law partners, their dependent children and any dependent children of their dependent children) and has been expanded to include
  • parents or step-parents
  • a parent’s or step-parent’s spouse or common-law partner
  • a guardian or tutor
In respect of a parent, dependent child is defined in IRPR as a child who
  • (a) has one of the following relationships with the parent, namely,
    • (i) is the biological child of the parent, if the child has not been adopted by a person other than the spouse or common-law partner of the parent, or
    • (ii) is the adopted child of the parent; and
  • (b) is in one of the following situations of dependency, namely,
    • (i) is less than 22 years of age and is not a spouse or common-law partner, or
    • (ii) is 22 years of age or older and has depended substantially on the financial support of the parent since before attaining the age of 22 years and is unable to be financially self-supporting due to a physical or mental condition.
Find additional information related to the interpretation of a dependent child:

Travel restriction exemptions

Immediate family members of Canadian citizens and permanent residents

A foreign national who is an immediate family member of a Canadian citizen or permanent resident is exempt from the travel restrictions and permitted to travel to Canada if they have the required travel documents.
Where the foreign national is a child, age and dependency is a factor. However, note that a foreign national who is an adult child of a Canadian citizen or permanent resident residing in Canada may be exempt under the family reunification exemption.
Where the foreign national is a parent, the Canadian citizen’s or permanent resident’s age is not a factor, and there is no requirement to establish dependency.
The immediate family member’s physical location is not a factor. They may be in Canada, in a third country, or accompanying the foreign national.
Travellers are expected to self-identify to airlines at the point of boarding that they are exempt under this provision by presenting documentation to establish their family member’s Canadian citizenship or permanent resident status and their relationship to that family member.

Recommended documentation for travel

Documentation showing their immediate family member’s Canadian citizenship or permanent resident status, such as a
  • Canadian passport
  • proof of Canadian citizenship such as a citizenship certificate, citizenship card or provincial or territorial birth certificate
  • Canadian permanent resident card
  • Canadian permanent resident travel document (visa counterfoil)
  • visa-exempt foreign passport and IRCC Special Authorization for Canadian Citizens (see below)
Documentation showing their relationship to that family member, such as a
  • marriage or common-law status certificate
  • birth certificate
  • Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR) for the family class (the COPR category under Application Details will be FC) or under the one-year window (coded OYW under Special Program)
  • other document(s) supporting an immediate family connection (for example, correspondence from IRCC showing spousal sponsorship in progress or documentation indicating a common residential address)
Paper and electronic copies of the documents listed above are acceptable.

Role of IRCC

Air carriers who require assistance to confirm that a foreign national passenger is eligible for this exemption will communicate through established channels with Transport Canada and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

Family reunification

The interim order also exempts foreign nationals whose travel to Canada is authorized in writing by an officer designated under IRPA or an employee of Global Affairs Canada (GAC) for the purpose of reuniting immediate family members.
The expanded definition of immediate family member described above continues to apply.
In order for a foreign national to be eligible under this exemption, there must be two or more foreign nationals who are immediate family members of each other, and authorizing one or more of them to enter Canada must allow them to be reunited.
While the foreign national’s immediate family member must be a resident in Canada, that family member does not have to be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.
This means that a foreign national with an immediate family member residing in Canada as a worker, visitor, student or protected person would be included in this exemption.
An adult child of a person residing in Canada may be eligible under this exemption. This is because, while the child is not an immediate family member of the parent under the definition above, the parent is an immediate family member of the child.
The objective of this exemption is to facilitate reuniting immediate family members who have been separated as a result of these travel restrictions. Migration officers and case processing officers are to assess the circumstances surrounding the foreign national’s travel prior to authorizing in writing that the foreign national is exempt under this provision.

Recommended documentation for travel

A CBSA or IRCC officer or GAC employee will provide a letter to the client to demonstrate to the airline that they are authorized to travel to Canada under this exemption.

Role of IRCC

Processing applications for temporary resident visas and electronic travel authorizations
While the travel restrictions are in effect, IRCC will only be issuing new temporary resident visas or electronic travel authorizations to foreign nationals who can demonstrate that they need to travel to Canada urgently. As the migration officer or case processing officer must verify the purpose of travel, they can also assess whether the foreign national is covered by an exemption under the Orders.
Where the foreign national’s immediate family member is a foreign national resident of Canada, this exemption will apply. To facilitate the foreign national’s travel to Canada, the officer should prepare and send an email authorizing travel under this exemption at the same time that they issue the temporary resident visa or electronic travel authorization. A template authorization will be shared with the processing networks.
Support to CBSA officers and GAC employees
CBSA officers and GAC employees who require assistance to confirm that a foreign national passenger is eligible for this exemption will seek guidance from CBSA and GAC, respectively, through established channels.
Government of Canada officials may contact the IRCC Operations Support Centre (OSC) to verify immigration status and family relationships to the extent that this information is available in immigration records.

International students

The interim order exempts foreign nationals who held a valid Canadian study permit or were issued a letter of invitation dated on or before March 18, 2020, the date on which the first interim order came into force.
These international students were already enrolled at a designated learning institution (DLI) in Canada or had been accepted by a DLI and made arrangements to come to Canada to study before the travel restrictions were put in place.
These foreign nationals can self-identify to airlines at the point of boarding that they are exempt under this provision by presenting
  • a valid study permit, or
  • a letter of introduction from IRCC dated on or before March 18, 2020

Temporary workers

The interim order exempts certain foreign nationals who are authorized to travel to Canada to work.
This includes temporary workers who were already established in Canada or who had made arrangements to come to Canada to work before the travel restrictions were put in place. It also includes new workers who are coming to Canada to be employed in critical industries, such as agriculture, food processing, health, transportation and emergency services.
These foreign nationals can self-identify to airlines at the point of boarding that they are exempt under this provision by presenting
  • a valid work permit, or
  • a letter of introduction from IRCC

Permit-exempt work

The interim order provides for a number of scenarios where the foreign national is not required to obtain a work permit:
  • providers of emergency services, including medical services, for the protection or preservation of life or property (includes firefighters)
  • students in a health field, including as a medical elective or clinical clerk at a medical teaching institution in Canada, for the primary purpose of acquiring training, if they have written approval from the body that regulates that field
  • foreign nationals seeking to enter and remain in Canada solely to become a member of a crew of a means of transportation, including a vessel engaged in international transportation
These foreign nationals can self-identify to airlines at the point of boarding that they are exempt under this provision by presenting alternative documentation. This will generally include a letter of invitation from a relevant organization in Canada (federal, provincial or municipal government entity for emergency services providers, teaching institutions for medical students, or shipping agents for persons joining vessels).

Permanent resident visa holders

The interim order exempts foreign nationals who have been approved for permanent residence and who were eligible to travel to Canada to become landed permanent residents on or before March 18, 2020, the date on which the first interim order came into force.
Many of these foreign nationals had already made arrangements to settle in Canada before the travel restrictions were put in place. Facilitating their entry for the purposes of landing contributes to meeting immediate family reunification and labour market needs and reduces the accumulation of an inventory of approved permanent residents who will need to travel to Canada once restrictions are lifted.
These foreign nationals can self-identify to airlines at the point of boarding that they are exempt under this provision by presenting
  • a permanent resident visa (nationals from visa-required countries only), or
  • a COPR document (all foreign nationals)

Accredited officials

The interim order exempts foreign nationals who are exempt from the requirement to obtain a temporary resident visa under paragraph R190(2)(a) and their immediate family members. Note that the broader definition of immediate family members continues to apply.
The foreign national must hold a passport that contains a diplomatic acceptance, a consular acceptance or an official acceptance issued by the Chief of Protocol for GAC on behalf of the Government of Canada. They must be a properly accredited diplomat, consular officer, representative or official of a country other than Canada, of the United Nations or any of its agencies or of any international organization of which Canada is a member.

Protected persons

The interim order exempts protected persons within the meaning of subsection A95(2).
A protected person is a person on whom refugee protection is conferred under subsection A95(1) and whose claim or application has not subsequently been deemed to be rejected under subsection A108(3), A109(3) or A114(4). The only document that may be presented to provide proof of this status is a Canadian refugee travel document issued by IRCC, in line with paragraph R39(c).

National interest

The interim order exempts a foreign national whose presence in Canada, in the opinion of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship or the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, is in the national interest.
This exemption may only be applied by any of the 3 ministers listed. The decision for the exemption will be made by the respective minister. The IRCC Case Management Branch will manage these situations in accordance with existing processes.

Transit passengers

The interim order exempts foreign nationals in transit through Canada to another country. Given the interplay between the interim order under the Aeronautics Act and related emergency orders under the Quarantine Act, the airport of arrival into Canada must have the facilities to permit the foreign national to connect to their destination without the foreign national having to present themselves for examination to enter Canada.

Crew members and foreign nationals entering Canada to become crew members

The interim order exempts foreign national crew members, including those arriving by air to join a vessel.
Airlines will permit boarding for seafarers travelling to Canada to join a ship’s crew if they are holding a seafarer’s identity document supplemented by a passport or other seafarer documentation, including proof of employment on a vessel at a Canadian port.
This exemption does not affect regular travel document and permit requirements for foreign nationals under IRPR.

Canadian citizens travelling on a foreign passport

Canadian citizens are encouraged to carry a valid Canadian passport at all times. Exceptionally, Canadian citizens may travel to Canada on a visa-exempt foreign passport with a special authorization. When this special authorization is issued, IRCC will produce a confirmation email approving the special authorization. For the purposes of the interim order, the Canadian citizen can provide this email to the airline to show they are not a foreign national and therefore not subject to this travel restriction. Note that the foreign passport number in the approval email should match the traveller’s foreign passport number.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Restrictions on entering Qld

The Restrictions on entering Queensland are these, found here:

Border restrictions

Direction from Chief Health Officer in accordance with emergency powers arising from the declared public health emergency

Border restrictions

Public Health Act 2005 (Qld)
Section 362B
On 29 January 2020, under the Public Health Act 2005, the Minister for Health and Minister for Ambulance Services made an order (Order) declaring a public health emergency in relation to coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The public health emergency area specified in the Order is for ‘all of Queensland’. Its duration has been extended by regulation to 19 May 2020 and may be further extended.
Further to this declaration, l, Dr Jeannette Young, Chief Health Officer, reasonably believe it is necessary to give the following directions pursuant to the powers under s362B of the Public Health Act 2005 to assist in containing, or to respond to, the spread of COVID-19 within the community.

Guidance

For the purpose of these directions, all travellers to Queensland including returning residents should practice social distancing and risk mitigation measures such as remaining 1.5 metres away from other persons, regular washing of hands, and limiting travel outside of the home or place of accommodation except for the purpose of purchasing food or other necessities.
This direction is to be read in conjunction with all other Public Health Directions.
This Public Health Direction may be referred to as the Public Health Direction – Border Restrictions.

PART 1 — QUARANTINE FOR TRAVELLERS

Directions

1.These directions apply from midnight on Wednesday 25 March 2020 until the end of the declared public health emergency, unless they are revoked or replaced.


Arrivals to Queensland

2.A person who arrives in Queensland from another State or Territory of Australia must self-quarantine for a period of 14 days, unless they are an exempt person.
3.Despite the direction in paragraph 2, an exempt person, who arrives in Queensland must self-quarantine for a period of 14 days if:
athey have been outside the border of Australia in the last 14 days; or
b  they travelled in the last 14 days to particular areas of Australia. The particular areas of Australia that require self-quarantine will be decided by the Chief Health Officer and published on the Queensland Health website.

Additional requirements for people arriving by aircraft

4.Any person who arrives by aircraft may not enter Queensland unless they provide the following information upon arrival:
a.Personal and contact details;
b.The address where they intend to stay in Queensland;
c.Information about where they have travelled in the last 30 days; and
d.Any other information requested in an arrivals form.
A person is an exempt person if they fall in any of the following classes of persons:

Queensland Residents

5.Any person who is ordinarily resident in Queensland.

National and State Security and Government employees

6.Any Government official who, in carrying out their duties, is responsible for the safety of Australia or Queensland against threats such as terrorism, war or espionage, and is required to be present in Queensland for such purposes.
7.Active military personnel required to be on duty in Queensland while in Queensland.
8.A member of the Australian Federal Police or Australian Border Force required to be on duty while in Queensland.
9.A Federal, State or local government employee, worker or contractor who is required to  return to Queensland to perform official duties in Queensland.
10.A Federal, State or local government elected representative who is travelling to Queensland to perform official duties in Queensland.
11.Consular employees as defined in the Consular Privileges and Immunities Act 1972 (Cth)  travelling to Queensland to perform official duties in Queensland.

Health Services

12.A health practitioner who is requested by the Queensland Chief Health Officer or delegate to present for duty in Queensland to perform health services.
13.A Queensland Ambulance Service employee, paramedic, or an officer of St John Ambulance Australia , RACQ Lifeflight crew, Royal Flying Doctor Service crew or other aeromedical services crew who are providing medical care and/or transport to a patient in Queensland.
14.A person who, in carrying out their duties, is responsible for providing health support services or for the maintenance, resupply or repair of health services infrastructure critical to Queensland. This includes Australian Red Cross Lifeblood.

Emergency services

15.Any person who, in carrying out their duties, is responsible for the provision of emergency services in Queensland and is required to be present in Queensland for such purpose. This includes Queensland Ambulance Service, St Johns Ambulance Australia, Queensland Police Service, Fire and Emergency Services and State Emergency Services.

Transport, freight and logistics

16.Any person who in performing their duties is responsible for provision of services for local passenger transport including bus services, taxi and ride share services, transport or freight of goods, or logistics for the goods, into, within and out of Queensland, on the condition that the person must practise social distancing wherever possible, including maintaining a distance of at least 1.5 metres where reasonably practicable and remain self-quarantined in their vehicle or accommodation.
17.Ship crew travelling from another State or Territory, for the limited period of delivery of persons, transport or freight of goods, or logistics for them, into, within and out of Queensland, on the condition  that the person must practise social distancing wherever possible, including maintaining a distance of at least 1.5 metres where reasonably practicable and must remain on board ship in self-quarantine until the ship departs Queensland or via a flight, where the self-quarantine period is less than 14 days.
18.A member of a domestic, commercial or charter flight crew who self-quarantine until departing Queensland on another flight.

Specialist skills critical to maintaining key government services, industries or businesses and fly in fly out workers

19.Any person who, in carrying out their duties, is responsible, while in Queensland, for construction, maintenance, resupply or repair of infrastructure critical to Queensland.
20.A person who is an employee of a construction, commercial fishing, manufacturing, mining, energy or agribusiness employee whose company or service provider has a plan to manage preventing the transmission of COVID-19 amongst its employees and the community, and the plan complies with the requirements specified by the Chief Health Officer. An employee who is fly in fly out worker is only exempt if they satisfy the requirements in paragraph 21 below.
21.A fly in fly out worker of company or service provider listed in paragraph 20, who is travelling to a worksite or work camp that is provided by their employer, and who has provided the following information upon arrival:
a.the name of their employer; and
b.evidence that they are a fly in fly out worker; and
c.evidence that they are entering Queensland to go directly to work; and
d.evidence of the location of the worksite or work camp.

People living and working close to the border of New South Wales, South Australia or the Northern Territory

22.Any person who is ordinarily a resident of a State or Territory that shares a border with Queensland, being New South Wales, South Australia and the Northern Territory and:
a.who either:
i.ordinarily works in Queensland; or
ii.travels to Queensland to obtain essential goods and services; and
b.enters Queensland, by crossing a land border, for the purposes of attending work or to obtain essential goods and services; and
c.does not propose to stay in Queensland for longer than reasonably necessary to attend work or obtain essential goods and services.
23.Any person who is ordinarily a resident of Queensland who works in New South Wales, South Australia or the Northern Territory or who travels outside of Queensland to obtain essential goods and services.

Persons entering Queensland on compassionate grounds or under compulsion of law

24.Any person, who:
a.ordinarily resides in another State or Territory; and
b.is a carer or relative of a dependant individual who is in Queensland; and
c.is required to travel to Queensland to care for the dependent individual.
25.Any dependant individual, who:
a.ordinarily resides in another State or Territory; and
b.is required to travel to Queensland to reside with a carer or relative who resides in Queensland because a carer or relative is unable to care for them in their home State or Territory.
26.Any person who is entering Queensland for essential medical treatment or to otherwise obtain essential goods and services necessary for the preservation of life.
27.Any person who is entering Queensland to visit a terminally ill relative or to attend a funeral.
28.Any person who is required to enter Queensland under orders of any Court of Australia or to give effect to orders of the Court.
29.Any person who usually resides in a residential facility in another State or Territory, for example, a boarding school or college, which is closed for scheduled holidays or because of COVID-19, who needs to return to Queensland to stay with family or a carer. 
30.Any other person, or class of persons, exempted by the Queensland Chief Health Officer because the Queensland Chief Health Officer considers:
a.they have compassionate or other grounds such that self-isolation would lead to an unusual, undeserved or disproportionate hardship; or
b.they are essential for the proper functioning of State; or
c.their location of residence requires them to move across the border to obtain critical goods and services.

Definitions

Essential goods and services means goods and services including, or to perform a function related to, the provision of food, healthcare, education and child care, energy, internet, waste and recycling management, finance and insurance.

Health practitioner means:
a.a registered health practitioner under the Health Practitioner National Law; or
b.the following health service providers under the Health Ombudsman Act 2013 (Qld):  audiologists, social workers, dieticians, speech pathologists and exercise physiologists providing community based clinical services and primary health care.
Note: a registered health practitioner includes a person registered in the following professions:
a. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practice;
b. Chinese medicine;
c. chiropractic;
d. dental (including the profession of a dentist, dental therapist, dental hygienist, dental prosthetist and oral health therapist);
e. medical;
f. medical radiation practice;
g. midwifery;
ga. nursing;
h. occupational therapy;
i. optometry;
j. osteopathy;
ja. paramedicine;
k. pharmacy;
l. physiotherapy;
m. podiatry;
n. psychology.

PART 2 — PENALTIES

A person to whom the direction applies commits an offence if the person fails, without reasonable excuse, to comply with the direction.
Section 362D of the Public Health Act 2005 provides:
Failure to comply with public health directions
A person to whom a public health direction applies must comply with the direction unless the person has a reasonable excuse.
Maximum penalty—100 penalty units.
Dr Jeannette Young
Chief Health Officer
25 March 2020
Published on the Queensland Health website at: 5:00pm

HOORAY! They are coming home

When Australia changed its rules just over a week ago so that the only people who could come here were Australian citizens, residents and their dependents, it was unknown how it might affect children born through overseas surrogacy.

In the past, when children were born in the US or Canada via surrogacy, typically they would come back here using their US or Canadian passport and an Australian electronic travel authority. When they got back here, they would then apply for and obtain Australian citizenship. At the time of the children's arrival in Australia, they were not recognised by the Australian government as the children of the Australian intended parents.

These children would need to obtain an Australian visa in order to be able to travel here. The alternative is that they would need to obtain Australian citizenship first before coming home- a process that recently takes 2 to 4 months for most.

Clients of mine found themselves stuck in the US. Their daughter was born- but they were unable to leave the US unless they obtained the visa or citizenship (and a passport) for her. Last week I made representations to their federal MP. His office helped.

This morning I received joyful news from my clients. They had their visa! They and their daughter will be back Saturday. HOORAY!

With the changes, instead of it being a 10 to 15 minute online process, intended parents in effect have to achieve the bureaucratic equivalent of climbing Everest. They have done so!

Department of Home Affairs now has an exemption form for COVID-19 travellers

 A camel, as they say, is a horse designed by a committee. The same could be said of the COVID-19 inquiry form that has started today with the Department of Home Affairs. At first blush it enables someone who is stuck and needs to get overseas the means to ask for an exemption. It is found here.


And then comes the big BUT. The form is useful for those who have already booked travel and have a definite flight. Most people now wanting to go overseas to be at their child's birth are not in that boat (excuse the pun). They have realised that they need to get over- and that they need an exemption before they can travel. If they had booked, chances are that the flight has been cancelled by Qantas or Virgin Australia.

If they try and book a flight now, the chances are that the airline will tell them that they cannot book unless they have an exemption first. Otherwise, the airline commits a civil penalty if it carries someone without the exemption.

In other words- the would be traveller can't get a booking, and in turn can't get an exemption by using the form.

I have helped clients instead by making representations to their Federal MP's who in turn are being asked to make representations to the Minister for Home Affairs, Peter Dutton. While this should be effective, it takes a lot of resources, compared to a streamlined process dealing direct with public servants.

I tried to sort it this afternoon by calling the Department of Home Affairs. I explained who I was, that I had many clients in this situation, that I was writing to a bevy of MP's  and that I would prefer a streamlined process- and be able to make life easier for intended parents- and the public servants involved. I explained that I understood that there was probably no one available to take my call when I called, but for someone to get back to me. After waiting a while, I was told that there was no one who could take my call- and to look at the Department's website.


AAAAAAAARRRRGGHH! Intended parents deserve better.


Yes, I will help those who are stuck on their surrogacy journeys

Today I was asked if I would help those who are stuck on their overseas journeys to be able to get overseas or if they are stuck overseas to help them get their babies home.

The simple answer is YES.

My firm, Page Provan, will help old and new clients who are stuck on their journeys or are fearful they might be stuck. it is an honour to help those who are seeking to become parents through surrogacy.

Having advised on 1600 surrogacy journeys, helped clients through a series of surrogacy crises before- and having both dealt with my own infertility and become a dad through surrogacy- I will do what I can, how I can, and won't give up- to enable clients to get overseas for their children- and get them home.

If you need my urgent help, either call me on 07 3221 9751 or email me on stephen@pageprovan.com.au.